Tuesday, July 20, 2010

12 Most Common Symptoms of Asperger's Syndrome

In general, autism in a child can be pretty apparent. One of the most notable symptoms is a speech delay. Asperger Syndrome can be much tougher to spot. There is no speech delay. I've listed the 12 most common symptoms of Asperger's. Keep in mind that this is not a complete list, and a child with Asperger's will not necessarily have all the symptoms. To compile this list, I did a Google search. Ironically, I found many of the lists lacking! So, I used WebMD's list and added on to it.

1) Problems with social skills: Children with Asperger's syndrome generally have difficulty interacting with others and often are awkward in social situations. They generally do not make friends easily. I have found that they generally do very well with other kids on the spectrum, however.


2) Eccentric or repetitive behaviors: Children with this condition may develop odd, repetitive movements, such as hand wringing or finger twisting. This is called stimming. Children do this to soothe themselves. Other common stims include spinning and jumping. I can usually spot a child on the spectrum immediately from this behavior.


3) Unusual preoccupations or rituals: A child with Asperger's syndrome may develop rituals that he or she refuses to alter, such as getting dressed in a specific order.


4) Communication difficulties: People with Asperger's syndrome may not make eye contact when speaking with someone. They may have trouble using facial expressions and gestures, and understanding body language. They also tend to have problems understanding language in context.


5) Limited range of interests: A child with Asperger's syndrome may develop an intense, almost obsessive, interest in a few areas, such as sports schedules, weather, or maps. My daughter loves to read about bugs, dinosaurs, outer space, extinct animals--pretty much anything related to science.


6) Coordination problems: The movements of children with Asperger's syndrome may seem clumsy or awkward. My daughter seems to have more than her share of mishaps, oftentimes because she is not paying full attention to what she's doing. She also has low muscle-tone, which is common with Aspeger's.


7) Sensory issues: many kids with Asperger's syndrome are either extra sensitive or less sensitive to sensory issues. For example, my daughter hates loud noises. She's told me that balloons popping HURT her ears. She seems to realize that they affect her more than they do other kids.


8) Difficulty with regulating emotions: my daughter will tantrum at little things because she has difficulties with problem-solving. She also just has a hard time with using other emotions or even just using her words to express herself.


9) Lack of empathy: children with Asperger's cannot empathize with other people.


10) Difficulties with transitions and rigidity: This is a biggie for my daughter. If she has to stop doing what she wants to do or do it in a different way then she wants to, it can cause tantrums.


11) Difficulty with imaginative play: children with Asperger's can be very literal and can have a difficult time with doing things like pretend play. This can be very difficult for the child with Asperger's with playing with other children.


12) Skilled or talented: Many children with Asperger's syndrome are exceptionally talented or skilled in a particular area, such as music or math. My daughter is very smart. She taught herself to read when she was 4 and got into reading about science and nature soon thereafter!


If your child is exhibiting some of these symptoms, does it mean he/she has Asperger's? Could be, but there are other things that can bring on these symptoms. Side effects from some medications, such as Singulair can bring on tantrums, for example. Also, some children who are highly gifted may exhibit some of these symptoms as well. I do think it's important to get your child assessed if you're worried. The therapies we've done with our daughter has made such a huge difference! She's learning how to play with other kids, how to regulate her emotions, how to be less rigid, how to play imaginatively, even how to empathize! Yay!

122 comments:

  1. Visiting from #31DBB - this is a great list! I taught in public schools for 9 years and have worked with students across the spectrum. I wish more people realized that these kids are kids too - not people to be avoided or made fun of.

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  2. I found you on 31DBB. I also have a son with Aspergers. Looking forward to reading your blog!

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  3. check check check check....and then some! Great that your daughter's "narrow interests" are something relatively constructive that she may be able to leverage later in life. Better science than Thomas the Tank!

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    1. my daughter is 8 and obsess with dolls and babies we have to go to carboot sales to buy everything for the NURSERY but hey ho she will proberly make a good mum

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    2. M son lines up and onsessed with his trains. He likes gears and robotics....maybe future engineers?

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    3. Thomas the tank- my brother used to be obsessed by that, up until about aged 10. Then we showed him a London tube map and now he's memorised it all and the timetables. He's done the same for the bus routes, too!

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    4. 9. is a load of rot.. We can learn empathy if we darn well find out our coping skills don't cut it with other people.. Alot has happened like non violent communication skills.. That is a simple cop out from a adhd/asperger mother to 2 autism adult sons whom have many friends and mastering skills to show empathy to people they hurt..

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    5. I disagree with no.9 I am a adhd/aspergers mother to 2 autism spectrum sons. They can and do show empathy, if parents bother to take the time and show this mastering skill through own actions

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    6. My daughter has EVERYTHING else on this list, expect she has empathy. In fact she has so much empathy that she will go running across the playground, barrelling through a bunch of other children to pick up a little one that has fallen over and take her to the office, then sit with her all through lunch till she is ready to go back out there. Because of her empathy have been rejected over and over for help with what I continue to believe is asbergers syndrome. They have instead called her ADHD and I will continue to disagree.

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  4. you never cease to amaze me. the amount of info you're sharing is really helping me understand autism. admittedly, i dont know much about asperger's syndrome. the first time i ever heard of it was from a character at boston legal...

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  5. you are doing really important things with your blog - its so helpful for people to know they are not alone.

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  6. Wow, this was very informative and a good list with good explanations. I had no idea that meds like Singulair could affect their behaviors. Amazing how early recognition and therapy can really impact and make a huge difference, thanks for sharing and so glad to hear about all the wonderful progress your daughter has made!

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  7. Except for #9 & #11, this list seemed very familiar. These were all things I've struggled with both in childhood & adulthood. But contrarily I'm OVER empathetic. Seeing someone cry, even if I have no idea why they're crying, will make me cry.

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    1. I'm overly empathetic also. I'm 100% certain I am on the spectrum..so you're not the only one.

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    2. I just found this article, and it describes my daughter exactly, she is also "overly empathetic" and I have been told many times that because of it she is not asbergers.... I am sure she is. http://psychcentral.com/lib/debunking-6-myths-about-asperger-syndrome/0008957/2

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    3. Its wrong to say people with aspergers dont feel empathy. We feel empathy as long as we can understand the situation in a rational way. Its not instinctive for us, but if we can "see" the other person situation, we can feel empathy.

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    4. I completely disagree with Aspies not having empathy. In recent studies this myth has been completely dispelled. Aspies do feel empathy for others, in fact they tend to be incredibly overwhelmed by that empathy. The confusion comes in with how they portray or express this empathy. Aspies find it difficult to read social cues and very often can not express their emotions through facial/body language. So people have assumed for years that Aspies do not have empathy because they do not respond in the way society feels they should when empathy is in play and therefore they do not feel empathy. However, if you give an aspie a chance to process what has happened and then ask him/her how this makes them feel you will be HUGELY surprised at just how intensely empathetic they are. This myth seriously needs to be cleared once and for all as it is just harmful to the sweet natured Aspies around the world who are treated like robots with no wiring for empathy and kindness.

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  8. Great list!
    Thanks for putting you and your family out there for other families to learn from!

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  9. This was wonderfully informative! I thought my 3 year old had Asperger's and searched and searched for a comprehensive list, so I wish I had found this earlier! Thank you! Your daughter sounds like a smarty, just like my son. =) We're still watching him, but the OT and ST think he's fine. Just quirky and engineering-like. Kinda like me and his dad.

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  10. Such a great list! I'm really enjoying reading your blog! It's got a lot of great information - especially for me as a future teacher!

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  11. Great comprehensive list. My son has ADHD and alot of these crossover, so I feel you give great info and support that many areas/conditions can be looked at. Until you get a diagnosis it can be hectic going through all these. I'm glad to see such an informative blog as yours.

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  12. Great job! It's so important for parents to be able to find the answers they need and it can be so hard to find information. This post is going to be a very valuable resource... way to go!!!

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  13. My Aspie teen is a gifted possum but he's hit puberty with a BANG.
    If you've heard tales of how hard autism and puberty are, believe them then multiply them by 1000.
    But life is good ;)

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  14. As someone with Aspergers, I think 'cannot empathise with other people' is not quite accurate. It's more about being unable to simultaneously see another person's point of view and your own together, rather than being unable to empathise. We find our own ways of learning to empathise - they're just not the typical ways. :-) So I'd say it's more that children on the spectrum have difficulty emphathising, rather than that they are unable to.

    (I always like to point that out, because assumptions that we can't empathise can cause a lot of harm - so this is my way of also spreading awareness, just like you are doing.)

    I like your list - it's comprehensive, and deals with the motor difficulties and sensory difficulties that a lot of lists leave out.

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    1. i agree, i find with me , when emphathising its a little to much nd with sensory its the same almost like i no before it happens dont know if its a problem or really just a gift,,,,?

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    2. I just came across this reply but I can not agree with it more so I wish to add to it. I want to do everything possible to crush this damaging myth that people on the more high functioning end of the spectrum are incapable of empathy. It does not come naturally like it does for an NT, but if someone takes the time to explain the emotion they are experiencing and they are a good communicator I can experience that same emotion, often much more intensely than the original person.

      IT took decades of work to develop that in myself, especially since there was no help for people in my age bracket. You were just highly intelligent and extremely awkward because your peers hadn't caught up to your intellectual level yet so don't worry about all of the other things that are now recognized as classic signs of autism.

      On the other hand, if professional help would have been available early on, it probably would have been from professionals who "knew" that I would have been incapable of developing empathy and maybe I never would have attempted to do those things on my own. Instead I found some really demonstrative friends who were nice enough to describe in detail what they were experiencing and didn't seem to find it weird that I was asking them to walk me through their every emotional state. I think for one or two of them it ended up being a bit of a cathartic experience for them, they were female and had never had a heterosexual male want to listen to their emotional states before so it was unique to them.

      Don't be afraid to push your kids boundaries as far as they can take it. Your kid is ultimately a unique person and where their limit of what they can do and accomplish is going to be unique to them. Once you get to a point they are comfortable, push a little farther down the road and see how much farther they can go. They will have set backs along the way, it's part of life but the ride is worth it and they get more out of it living that way. If you eventually hit the point where the kid can go no farther, that's ok, you found their limit line. But I have found that the line moves forwards and backwards and I have to adjust constantly as I age, but I constantly try to push it ahead. Just my opinion, for what it's worth.

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    3. Thanks for you insightful comments. If you read further down on the comments, you'll see that others had the same problem with my list. I came up with this list a few years ago, and my daughter has grown tremendously in this area! She actually did receive help from professionals who exposed her to these concepts. She grabbed and mastered them beautifully.

      Again, thanks for sharing your opinion!

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  15. First off, I want to thank everyone for their comments. There are so many great ones with this post. @capriwim: thank you so much for explaining this! I appreciate it!

    Frankly, I was appalled at how much has been left off the lists of many key sites I visited to prep for this post! Of course, this list isn't complete. This morning, I realized I left a key (to me) symptom off--scripting. I even wrote a post about it about a month ago. Sigh.

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  16. Great list. It really helps bring some clarity to a baffling condition.

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  17. As a cousin to two young men with Asperger's I found this list to mirror a lot of the behaviors I have watched as they have grown up. It is wonderful to see a support group of bloggers out there. I know my Aunts would have loved this type of forum.

    Thanks for visiting my blog today!

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  18. As the Aunt of a young girl with Asperger's I enjoy reading your blog & learning from it. Thanks for a great post.

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  19. It is worth emphasizing that the symptoms of Aspergers Syndrome are very diverse and every case has its own unique quirks and differences. Not all of the above symptoms will be present in every case and Aspies tend to learn to hide there symptoms incredibly well as they get older, but they are always present.

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  20. Zenemu: excellent points! Thanks for sharing them. I don't know if all Aspies learn to hide their symptoms, but I'm sure many do! Again, thanks for the thoughtful comment.

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  21. Almost all of these points describe one of my nephews and yet he has not been diagnosed. But believing that he could be really helps the extended family work with him. It helps us be a lot more patient and willing to work through the fits where he throws himself on the ground screaming.

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  22. Aspergers Syndrome usually shows much prospective when compared with those who have autism. The elevated level of brain functioning in many sufferers makes them to complete their higher education. Of course they lack behind in communal interface but they can develop lasting relationships with family and friends.

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  23. My son was recently diagnosed with Asperger's, and people seem to have a hard time understanding what that means. I would like to ask your permission to link to this post and use some of it on my blog (giving you credit, of course) as an explanation. This is the most comprehensive list I've seen. As you said, most lists or explanations are very "surface level" only and leave a lot off.

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  24. Gina:

    Absolutely! Feel free to also add scripting to the list. I can't believe I left that one out! Grrrr!

    Skyler: That is generally true, although kids with high-functioning autism (the only key difference being that they're speech-delayed) really presents very similar to Asperger's--in my opinion--and can also have the same great outcomes!

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  25. Found your site through SITS, and I'm so glad! I have a 17 year old son with Aspergers. He didn't get diagnosed until the fifth grade, his principal said she thought he should be on an IEP. (He went to private school before that and they never said anything). I knew he was different, but I knew nothing about Autism and didn't want to accept that my son could have it. It's actually only been the last couple years that I have accepted it, partially because I've learned so much on the internet about what it really is. Reading your list just drives it home, it's my son to a t! (Except the part about imaginative play, he's always done that well, just not with others). So I'm a new follower. I mention my son in one of my posts but have yet to really write alot about Aspergers, I can see doing it in the future though. Sorry for being long winded, it's not my fault, I'm Italian! Off to check out more of your wonderful blog......

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  26. my son has about 10 of those and the scripting too

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  27. Sadly, OCD has many of these characteristics, as well. Very difficult to diagnose.

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  28. Hi, no asperger's at my house, but your post is very interesting nonetheless. I do have one son who is dyslexic and the other is extremely INTENSE. Thanks for sharing this info!

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  29. My nephew was diagnosed with Asberger's on Friday. I think my sister is relieved to finally know why he's so different and to finally be able to help him. He's obsessed, by the way, with reptiles and amphibians. Many, many frogs and lizards have escaped in my sister's house.

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  30. My nephew has Asperger's and I am also a teacher. Thank you for publishing a very comprehensive and understandable list.

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  31. Great list. My son has Asperger's. I am putting a link to your list on my blog. :)

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  32. I found you on SITS, and I'm glad. Our oldest daughter has sensory integration for which she has done extensive OT....didn't really help. We are still searching for help.

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  33. great job
    Here from the Fantastic Jen's Blog gems

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  34. Visiting from Blog Gems too. A really interesting blog post.

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  35. Great list! I can't think of a thing you missed :)

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  36. The therapies that help... how to find them? I think my child is the "gifted" variety of quirky that you mention at the bottom. She has about 8 of the 12 symptoms you describe, to some degree. How can I help her learn how to play with other kids? Where do I find these child volunteers? :-)

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  37. "#9 - Children with Aspergers cannot empathize"

    This is simply not true. Maybe this affects your child but as an adult female with Aspergers it saddens me greatly to see this listed as a trait.

    There is research into Aspies and Empathy and what we actually find is an overabundance of empathy - to the point of causing physical pain and unintended reactions.

    Maybe that is where the confusion lies, NTs don't understand the responses so they say they are "incorrect," "lacking," or otherwise "deficient."

    My daily experience of empathy is above and beyond what any NT feels in the most extreme situations. Most Aspies have over-empathy - they feel TOO much. I may not always show you how I feel in ways you can decipher but please don't spread the rumor that children with Aspergers don't feel.

    They feel so much, they may shut down to self-protect.

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    1. I wrote this almost two years ago, and my views on empathy have changed a bit. Like most things with Asperger's, it probably depends on the person. While what you say is definitely true for you and others, there are definitely people that empathy doesn't come naturally. This was definitely the case with my daughter. I'm happy to say that empathy was something she was able to learn. She's now seems to have a higher level of empathy than many of her typical peers.

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    2. There are many kinds of empathy - cognitive (to "know" what another is feeling") is different emotional or altruistic empathy.

      She may have "more empathy" now because empathy is a higher brain skill not readily available to young children because it requires taking another's perspective.

      What I meant was that a lack of "feeling" is not the problem. Kids aren't born without the potential for empathy. Showing empathy may not come naturally but FEELING is always there.

      When you say they "lack empathy" - it seems like you are saying they don't feel.

      The executive center of the brain handles compassion and empathy - and shuts down when we are stressed. AS kids typically have more stress than the average child and therefore can get stuck in the lower brain centers.

      Also these kids are much more sensitive to discipline and criticism so you CAN certainly socialize empathy OUT of a person by not showing them any - but a deficit in "feeling" is misleading and untrue. That's all I mean.

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  38. I'm sorry but you just need to parent your child more and stop blaming their lack of skill on aspergers. Just my opinion

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    1. Oh, how cute! My very first troll!

      If you bothered to actually read my posts, you'd be hard-pressed to find a post about my child lacking skills. This blog was about celebrating the strengths of kids with Asperger's. I'm putting this in past tense since I've been having a difficult time even blogging about Asperger's since my daughter has progressed so much her behavior probably wouldn't register on the spectrum anymore.

      And regarding her skills? She's top of her class at a gifted magnet. Her teacher is in total awe of her. To put it in terms you can (maybe) understand: she'd be able to mop the floor with you.

      Now, constructive criticism is always welcomed (see comment above). But mean-spirited troll comments are not welcome.

      Go back under the bridge you crawled out from.

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    2. Awesome :-) Response!!!!!!

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    3. I love and admire your control

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    4. BB I find your comment ignorant as I find you an ignorant individual. How dare you say that to a parent with an AS child. Your comment proves you don't know one person with AS or even someone who knows someone with AS. You are what is wrong with our mental health system. Do you even have children cause it doesn't sound like it. If I wasn't on my cell searching for help for my 18 year old I would bury you in this post!

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  39. Thank you for sharing this. My husband and I are trying to figure out how to best help our daughter with her little quirks. We know something is different, but we haven't been able to find an official diagnosis from a medical professional yet since we just started seeking their advice. Things seem to be pointing to high functioning Aspergers, so I'm hoping to be able to start therapies soon.
    Like you, we just want her to be able to find ways to live life as happily as possible.

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  40. Thank you for sharing this. My husband and I are trying to figure out how to best help our daughter with her little quirks. We know something is different, but we haven't been able to find an official diagnosis from a medical professional yet since we just started seeking their advice. Things seem to be pointing to high functioning Aspergers, so I'm hoping to be able to start therapies soon.
    Like you, we just want her to be able to find ways to live life as happily as possible.

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  41. My goodness reading your list has just opened my eyes. My daughter is 4, VERY smart, in fact she is probably a year or so ahead cognitively BUT, she has always had delayed gross motor skills (not so much now, but when she was younger) and has always flapped her hands and twisted her fingers. I have been watching her very closely and more and more I have been thinking that there is definitely something there. I can put a tick next to a lot of those symptoms. I may speak to my GP the next time I see him.
    THANK YOU!!!!

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  42. My goodness reading your list has just opened my eyes. My daughter is 4, VERY smart, in fact she is probably a year or so ahead cognitively BUT, she has always had delayed gross motor skills (not so much now, but when she was younger) and has always flapped her hands and twisted her fingers. I have been watching her very closely and more and more I have been thinking that there is definitely something there. I can put a tick next to a lot of those symptoms. I may speak to my GP the next time I see him.
    THANK YOU!!!!

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    1. My main advice is to listen to your instinct. If you feel something is "off," you might be right. A mother's instinct should never be ignored.

      That being said, a GP might not be the best person to go to. My daughter's pediatrician never saw it in my daughter. She's really good around adults. It took a psychologist observing her with her peers at her preschool to see what the issues were.

      Best of luck to you. I wrote this post over two years ago. My daughter is doing great. She's improved in so many areas! She attends a gifted school and has many friends there!

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    2. This is good to know . Been struggling trying to find help for my daughter who is 4 and my mom instinct just says something is off but GP keeps telling me its "middle child" syndrom grr.

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  43. I have a grand daughter who show many signs on the list. She just turned 3 yrs old...Has difficulties with speech and interactiving with other children. She seem angry most of the time.. She repeat the sames word overs and other:ex- I eat, or similar 3 word phrases... I am trying to get her assessed but am being told to wait until she attend school...I don't know what to do

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    1. Evie, I am certainly no expert but I hear that the earlier a child is assessed and able to receive therapy, the better. I don't know who is telling you to wait until she goes to school, but I would trust your gut and have her assessed as soon as possible

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  44. Hi there! I am an adult, but have always felt different, and noticed I have never been 'like' other people. I have bout 10 of these traits on this list (and some others that aren't here as well), and I have been doing some research about myself over the past year, and have come to the official conclusion (as official as it can be without an official diagnosis) that I am an Aspie. My question to you is, where would you recommend I go from here? I have read in many places that getting a diagnosis as an adult is hard to do, as people tend to outright dismiss the individual, or just look down on them in other ways. I guess my question is, where should I start?

    Thanks in advance!

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    1. I'm probably a bit on the spectrum myself! My thought is that if you made it to adulthood and are functioning fine, you probably don't need to do anything. I bet just understanding what Asperger's is about helps everything make sense a little bit. Personally, I think a great place to start is visiting my friend, Stimey's blog at http://www.stimeyland.com . Stimey has a child with Asperger's and recently got herself diagnosed as well. I think you'll find her posts on the topic interesting and informative. It's a start anyway!

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  45. I thank you for this list! My husband and I read it, and it hit home every time. We have an apt with a psychiatrist soon, and will use your list in conjunction with ours. I've actually been homeschooling, because the behavior at school was so bad. Looking forward to better days for all of us!

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  46. I have a question, you see, i suspect my 11 yr. old son has this. When he was 3, he taught himself how to read and he speaks very complex so i and my husband can't understand. By the time he was 4 he started studying geography, astronomy and math. By the time he was five, he can mentally multiply and divide as he memorized already the multiplication tables. When he changed school, I got surprised that he cried and he said "I don't want there, i want my old school since my ONLY friend is there". I actually got really shocked when he said ONLY friend. I actually notice that he never stare at me and it is like he has his own world. He also has weird gestures and by the time he's 9, his eye grade reached 350 on both eyes . Does he have aspergers and by the way, he had speech delay as he only started talking at 2 years.

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    1. I'm not a doctor and can no way make a diagnosis. If you suspect something is off, then you should get him assessed. Also, I don't know what an eye grade is! :) (I'm guessing he's very near-sighted? Nothing to do with Asperger's).

      First off, a don't think speaking at 2 is considered a horrible speech delay (but kids with Asperger's often don't have speech delays).

      His academics are truly amazing. It's possible that he's highly gifted. I have a blog post somewhere on the overlap between Asperger's and being gifted. It can be really hard to tell the difference between the two--or both could be at play. I do think kids that are off-the-chart smart can have a hard time finding friends as well. Other kids can have a hard time relating to them.

      Bottom line? You won't know until you get him assessed by a qualified professional--if you feel you need to.

      Best of luck with whatever path you choose to take!

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  47. My 4 year old grandson is certainly quirky. he has several symptoms of aspergers, but the thing is, he is extremely sociable and makes eye contact. is he on the low end of the spectrum or could it be something else?
    one thing i noticed, but haven't mentioned to my daughter, is that he has low-set ears. she is in the process of testing right now but no one has ever mentioned aspergers.
    if anyone has anything to say about the fact that he is socially skillful, i'd be most grateful for your opinion.
    right now we live in different countries. i don't want to scare my daughter. she knows there's something wrong and i do too. the low-set ears have always bothered me but no pediatrician has ever commented on them.

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    1. There's a saying that if you meet one person with Asperger's you've met one person with Asperger's. It can present itself so differently among people! Some people with Asperger's certainly have good eye contact. When I read that your grandson was sociable, though, my first thought was, "It's not Asperger's." However, my daughter is sociable now, although it doesn't come naturally to her. It's good that your daughter is getting him assessed. It could very well be that your grandson is gifted. There's such an overlap between kids that are gifted and those that have Asperger's. My daughter is going to a school for gifted kids, and she's had a much easier time making friends there! Oh, and just FYI, calling someone "low end of the spectrum" means they're lower-functioning. I'm pretty sure you meant high-end of the spectrum! Let me know how you're grandson is doing!

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  48. Cheryl, thanks so much for replying to me. Yes, i guess i meant to say high-end of the spectrum. am new at this. i live in the himalayas in india and have seen my grandson three times for a few months each visit. i last saw him when he just turned three. he speaks english, understands hindi, urdu and punjabi. He has a great brain, etc. with a vocabulary of a much older child. loves to be on stage at school functions. i also have an intelligent granddaughter (his sister) but at six years old doesn't sound as mature as him. maybe he is gifted. but he has many of those asperger's symptoms that frankly i am really frightened. thank you so much - you've cheered me up. am hoping that it's as simple as that - that he's gifted. i will let you the results of the exams.

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    1. The Himalayas? Wow! As a blogger, that's amazing that someone the other side of the world read my post! Even if it's "worse-case" scenario, and her grandson does have Asperger's, there's no reason to be worried! I can totally understand the feeling--I was at that place when my daughter was first diagnosed. But I love her in all her quirkiness. She's an awesome kid, and I honestly wouldn't want her any other way. Yes, she can be challenging at times. But I've seen kids NOT on the spectrum be challenging as well. Overall, I think my daughter is probably EASIER to raise that a kid NOT on the spectrum. She's smart and funny! We did get her help through play therapy, and she learned a lot through it. So she can now empathize and socialize with other kids. There's no reason why she can't live a fairly normal life. Do some research and discover what famous people have (or are suspected of having) Asperger's or high-function autism: Einstein, Bill Gates, Mark Zuckerberg, Edison, Mozart, etc. Pretty much anyone seen as a fantastic genius! So don't despair. It sounds like your daughter is seeking out help. Hugs!

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    2. Hi there. I have been doing a lot of research to understand Asperger's more because my children are being tested now to rule out or confirm the disorder. Just wanted to comment regarding what I read explaining the fact that the child loves to be on stage at school functions. I understand there is a difference in how socially an Aspie can handle entertaining exceptionally well to the extent of becoming a stand up comedian. However, if you put that same person one on one with someone to have conversation or to be questioned by a panel of people is a whole different story to them socially and is much more uncomfortable for them. Has to do with the level of interaction with people they are involved with. Still learning about all of this very complex and overwhelming subject so I hope this helps and makes sense. God bless :)

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  49. I have aspergurs and Im 15. I am extremely terrified of load noises, like the Hoover, hand dryer and i even run away after flushing the toilet! And i am awful in social situations which is frustrating because i love people, but i can get scared when socialising. I also get frustrated and upset when people don't see the way i do..because then they just seem really stupid to me X) xx

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    1. Wow, I can really relate to your last point! I have no patience in those situations, even though I know I need to take a deep breath and try to see things from another person's perspective! :) (Yes, my daughter comes by her Asperger's pretty honestly--I have some of the traits too). Have you gone to any social skills classes or received therapy on how to approach social situations? They've helped my daughter a lot with being less awful in social situations. She can still be a bit awkward, but I've seen huge improvement! If you haven't, you should look into it. If you have the desire, then it can be helpful! I'm also a big fan of finding other people with Asperger's to socialize with. My daughter doesn't feel out of place with them and socializing seems to go great! Just some thoughts!

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  50. my son matched almost of these points. he is 4years old and teachers in the daycare mentioned that he hardly to make friends and never speak but behavioris very well. As we speak two languages both English and Chinese at home so pretty much we thought that is a reason for his language delay. but I always know that he is different and something is there. I also reseached the website about "selective mutism". I have no idea which is my son. However,my son is kinda of gifted child, he is very good at pizzles and blocks, when he plays these, I can tell that he has very good logic NOT the mechanised memory. he also has very sensitve on taste, that is why he is so fussy on the food. he also only wear certain clothes and shoes , very hard to let him to try sth new. thanks for your blog, it give s me more ideas.

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  51. My9 year old son matched almost every one of those. He actually uses an alpha smart at school for part of the day because his handwriting isn't legible. He sits ob a disk pillow because he is constantly moving. He did have fidgety toys but they're broken and haven't been replaced. He has very poor coordination. He has ot/pt at school as well as private or/pt. The school did a full evaluation on him when he was 8 and he didn't quite scoreon the spectrum. He has been diagnosed as inattentive add & has spd. He has an IEP at school and they make some modifications & accommodations but he still struggles.

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  52. As a teenager with Aspergers it really irritates me when people say Aspies have no empathy! i cry at lots of things, i feel empathy for kids less fortunate than i, i feel lots of empathy regarding animals especially and of course, when disasters happen, im usually the first to start tearing up.

    my brother is the oppsote in every way. finds it hard to emphasise with people in a situation different than he has ever experienced. he just does not get it.

    so please, no all Aspies are incapable of empathy, lots are very capable, once they understand whats going on.

    just a litle stereotype that bugs me !

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  53. Thanks for your insightful comment! Empathy did not come naturally to my daughter. But as you pointed out, once she learned the concept, she was able to internalize it and is very empathetic now!

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  54. Hi there, I am 18 years old and my parents have always suspected me with Dyspraxia but there is such an overlap I'm not sure.

    I have to put this into two posts to fit it in.

    I was on the dyspraxic scale when I was little but not enough to have a full diagnosis. My college now are looking into getting me assessed but they aren't determining what for and are calling it a 'processing difficulty' or something like that. Reading this list made my jaw drop! It just sounds so similar to this, I am now confused as to what it could be.

    I am sociably awkward, I can go up to people and introduce myself but with close friends and even family I find myself being quite awkward with conversing at times. I find this the hardest to explain out of the list. In some ways I don't feel socially awkward, I am good at meeting new people but in other ways I do? I don't make friends easily, my lack of filter on what I say and speaking on impulse doesn't help. I also can talk on and on, and quickly - i.e: rambling (especially when nervous).Again is this a symptom of aspergers? dyspraxia?

    I do have repetitive behaviours but I don't know if they are odd or not? I don't remember child ones either, may have to talk to my parents about this.

    Number 4 is me, I can't make eye contact with anyone. Even with close friends, family, teachers etc. I don't know why though, I think I find it uncomfortable? I love my friends but I am slow to understand sarcasm and read between the lines so they love teasing me about it. I don't mind, I just get frustrated with myself. This also links with 11! This was the thing that made me question everything. I have always been literal.When I was younger I was helping my dad build a pond and he asked me to pass him the pump box. I took the pump out and brought him the box. (I don't remember this FYI, my parents told me). Other instances too, but I take what people say literally. I can sometimes distinguish but I think that's an age thing - I've learnt as I got older. When I was younger, I wouldn't be able to do that.

    I actually have a large range of sporting interests but I have always had a tendency to ''obsess'' over a small number of things I enjoy. When I was younger, similarly to your daughter I would spend AGES looking through science books and loved science as a child. We still have all our old books, and I see now how many I had. I'm not so good at it now though, to A level standards. I think the two things I would focus on as a child would be reading in general and swimming/the sea/the beach etc. I need to ask my parents more about the reading thing, but I only discovered recently my reading habits as a child were advanced and unusual. At parents evening they discussed my reading as a child with my teacher and my parents were (embarrassingly) saying how much I would read and what like it was a special thing and I brushed it off. I said all children did that, cause I assumed they did. My teachers looked a bit stunned and said children didn't and it was unusual. I would read very long advanced books from a young age and finish them in a short amount of time. I can also still remember references in the books. I could read for days ON END. On holiday I think I read through a whole series barely stopping. Does this sound aspergers-like? (CONTINUED TO POST 2)

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  55. The co-ordination problems is what triggered the dyspraxia to be questioned when I was younger. I am as described in your post. I am clumsy and despite going to the gym, my muscle tone is very weak no matter how much I try to tone up (with the exception of my back muscles). I don't have problems with sensory issues but I have huge difficulty regulating emotions. I feel empathy, in huge doses but there is a difference between feeling/thinking it and knowing how to express it. I rarely cry, and haven't cried at the saddest things to happen in my life so far but I will at really stupid things which shouldn't bother me. I feel sympathy towards people regularly, but I don't often express it towards them because I am bad at it. Number 10 is a HUGE yes for me too, always has. So many occasions come to mind. Even if I know the way I'm doing it might not be the best, I won't budge. Despite being very literal, and this might sound odd, I am actually very imaginative and was as a child. They might seem unlikely traits to go together but I am both. (A lot of my personality is actually opposite traits working together - if that makes any sense). However, I have huge dis-organisational problems at the moment and I am getting very stressed about what could be wrong. I didn't before, but I am being assessed so I can't help worrying about all this. I have some other 'quirks' but who knows if that's personality or something else. Also I was recently 18, so no longer a child. Is getting assessed for whatever this may or may not be worth it? Will it have negative affects for jobs in future? I am sure I am on the spectrum, but it may be more dyspraxia. Although, some of the symptoms for dyspraxia I don't have - I read and write quickly and well (which is a big one). I also have dyspraxic symptoms like not telling left from right and having difficulty reading a clock face. My sister said my parents also wondered about ADHD when I was little - so imagine how confused I am now! I do think getting assessed has positives, because it will help teachers understand me better and my friends but I haven't told them about the assessment yet and not sure I would want to. Any advice about what to do?

    Thank you - Sorry it was so long. Never posted about all this before.

    NB: A thing to mention, I have an above average IQ (I took a test and it was around 127) and good GCSEs (2 A stars, 5 As and 2Bs) but I am struggling to cope with the work demands of A Levels (If this isn't a UK blog - They are high school exams, GCSEs are taken at age 15/16. A Levels are taken at 17/18). I am worried about university.

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    1. Wow! Longest comment ever! I think pursuing an assessment might be helpful--more to you than anyone else. It might answer questions that seems like they need questioning. It shouldn't affect future employment because you could keep the results quiet. I also think society is more open-minded to Asperger's anyway and learning that people with Asperger's have some wonderful strengths! I have a post in my blog somewhere about all the famous people who have it (or are thought to have had it). Pretty much anyone with a talent for art or invention are on the list! :)

      I must admit, that when I read up on Asperger's, I felt I hit a lot of the issues as well. I think my daughter comes by it honestly. Ahem.

      Best of luck to you! I'm sure you'll do fine on your exams. College takes adjustment, but the secret is staying on top of your classes and not letting the work get away from you!

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    2. I know - sorry I have a tendency to do that (speaking and writing)haha. Thanks for your reply, it's made me a little bit less stressed. I'm going to have to start finding ways to keep on top of the work but it's good advice you gave. Sorry about the comment length! I always do that, always over the word limit for school essays ;) Thanks again

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  56. Ok this could get quite long winded so I apologise upfront! My son is 8 years old and to complicate has had a heart defect (repaired at 2 weeks of age), has profound hearing loss in Right ear and has had speech delay (but I put this down to hearing loss), he is a quirky kid and has always been a little different to other peers his age, he loves other children, but his enthusiasm and inability to pick up on social cues usually finds him with not friends, or in constant bickering with the children of my friends, he makes strange comments like 'the little men in my fingers who make my fingers work', or 'I love byron bear more than I love my family' (byron bear being the bear he has had since birth and he sleeps with every night) and if he hurts himself he doesn't cry for me he cry's for the byron bear. He gets very angry easily and is easily annoyed, he never wants to go somewhere but once there he gets very angry if we are about to leave, I wouldn't say he is gifted in anyway as he tends to struggle at school although he is better at maths than all other subjects, he is totally obsessed with minecraft and will play it or sit for hours watching youtube videos of other people playing it. He has alway had this thing that he squeezes the end of his penis, it is like he doesn't even know he is doing it. I look at your list and say mm yeah but I don't know if as a mum I know there is something that is different but I just don't know what that is! Any wise words would be greatful and I am not asking for a diagnosis but am seeing the pead in a week and would like some ideas to discuss with him. Thanks for you time and help x

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    1. The only advice I can give is to listen to your gut. If you feel something is "off" it probably is. Pediatricians aren't always in tune to kids who are high-functioning. They just don't see issues in the office visits, quite often. But listen to your gut. I spent a year ignoring mine and wish I hadn't! :)

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    2. My aspie is addicted to minecraft too. He also pulls on his wonky. He used to blame things on a Mr. Patterson but that stopped. He struggles in mainstream school because he has no interest in most subjects. Some things are very similar to your son and I know exactly how you feel. If you are concerned he may have aspergers, get him seen by a reputable therapist or psychologist. :)

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  57. Hi~ great article & comments! Please consider: supplementing with Vitamin D/K2, Magnesium Chloride Oil Spray, & B12 (all by either Thorne Research, Pure Encapsulations, &/or for Mag Chlor Ancient Minerals or Life-Flo~ all on Amazon & iHerb) can make a Huge difference! Also, trying gluten-free, no orange juice, dairy-free. Especially for hyper-sensitive hearing the Mag Chlor works miracles.
    These can all help with being symptom-free & give the space for innate gifts to blossom. Yay!

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  58. PS
    Spatial & organization challenges can also be well-remedied with Magnesium Chloride Oil Spray supplementation! Sprayed on too, rather than oral supps, does not cause diarrhea (apologies) enabling one to come out of a deficient state more rapidly.
    Can also help with migraine, muscle pain, & muscle laxity, All Heart Conditions.
    Amazing what magnesium deficiency is responsible for- amazing what supplementing, correctly, addresses!
    Anyone who's been in surgery should research Magnesium Chloride supplementation as anaesthesia depletes magnesium terribly.
    Source: personal experience- having been sent home from hospital in a wheelchair as a five year old- told I wouldn't walk again. Rubbish! Correct vitamin supplementation has literally saved my life.
    Good Luck in Your Research & Best Health!
    PS Temple Grandin is a great "Aspie" role model her books are also on Amazon.

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  59. i would say most kids diagnosed with AS have some but not all of the symptoms you listed. i suppose the more severe case the more symptoms/behavioral challenges

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  60. Hi, my son is 3 yrs old and from about six months old we thought he was having fits, brought him to our gp they said nothing wrong, but this has now progressed to him running in circles flapping his hands eyes blinking and closing, I can identify with some of the above-mentioned, had him referred to child devlop b4 Xmas, was told the had 3 flags in 1 sector so was told I should wait until he's at primary school, only problem is he is zoning out and last week fell and cut his head, his nursery haven't been much help and thinks he should wait until his 2nd year at nursery before being assessed by education physicist, brought him back to gp today as I feel I'm getting nowhere, but while there he did almost dropped something HE SAID SORRY gp says he doesn't have as because as kids have no empathy. He is know being referred for jacksonian epilepsy, which I've looked at and this is not how my child is I'm at my wits end, has anyone any advice

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  61. For the final time, Aspies are not sociopaths, as 9) seems to suggest. They have difficulty expressing empathy; that doesn't mean they don't feel it. Aspies are often some of the warmest hearted people when you crack their icy exterior.

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  62. I was diagnosed with Aspergers as an adult female and I have probably TOO much empathy for people, so this trait apparently does not occur in females all the time. From what I read, lack of empathy is actually less likely to be seen in females with Aspergers, or at least in mild Aspergers like I apparently have.

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    1. Really great point (and consistent with other comments above). My daughter, now that she's older seems to be displaying that as well.

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  63. My some can't stand the th sound in spoken language. He also cares very little about school or work. My question is about things like the th issue ( he cringes and says oiy). He says this hurts his body. Does anyone else with an aspie have a similar situation? It really effects him sometimes.

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  64. My son has some of the signs of Aspergers but has speech difficulties (difficulties with some letters). He is 9 and has been in speech therapy for most of his life. He has made great progress, though. It says that people who have ASpergers do not have speech delays. Is that always the case?

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    1. I think when they say speech delay, they're talking about the ability to speak, not articulating certain sounds. In general, a true speech delay would be considered high-functioning autism vs. Asperger's. That's the main difference between the two--from my understanding.

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  65. Its not true that people with Aspergers don't have empathy. Its definitely not true of me. If anything I have too much empathy and get taken advantage of sometimes. I wouldn't want to change that though. People with Aspergers think in a different way, a different pattern I would say I notice when around other people who are "Aspies". Its not inferior. Saying people with Aspergers/Autism have no empathy is really offensive. And its not ok to just say well some people with Aspergers do some don't. If thats the case than its not a symptom. The way you stated it doesn't exactly leave room for doubts or anything other than we all don't have empathy. We are basically selfish soulless sociopaths without a care for our fellow human beings. Then rumors start spreading in the media that people with Aspergers are serial killers. I had people at my own church who don't know I have it telling me well you know the problem is Aspergers thats whats causing these shooting spreees. As far as socially awkward goes, yes there is some truth to that. However I have learned a lot as I have gotten older, everything written about Aspergers/Autism is almost exclusively focused on children. I think most people with Aspergers study social interaction the way an immigrant from a foreign land might observe American culture to understand it and participate in it, and we tend to be quite intelligent so eventually we figure it out.

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  66. I am in the process of getting my 10 year old son assessed for asperger's. This is one of the best lists of symptoms I have seen - I know that my son is different but have felt guilty about trying to get a diagnosis. Looking at the above list I could tick off at least 7 of the symptoms so feel more confident about seeking help.

    Thank you so much

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    1. Unfortunately, you need the diagnosis to get services. The services have helped my daughter tremendously! Best of luck to you and your son.

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  67. When my daughter was 5 she was referred to a paediatrican for an assessment (my choice as I noticed so many differences)- thought to be ADHD. After the graph scaling etc.. for almost 3 years they said it might be ASD/ High functioning Aspergers. he it was just left...I worked with her through the obssesions, sensory sensitivity, socail queue etc and she fitted in better in school. She is 12 now- nearly 13 and iconstantly saying she is tired or unwell. She says she is tired as an excuse for everything. I don't think she is aware properly of true emotions?
    She has been off school for 4 weeks as she has had a number of infections and a virus. She has the same routine after school every single day when she comes home, and gets stressed when it can't happen. SHe crues - alot over tiny things. She also get totally stressed out if we have to rush. She seems quite robotic at the moment compared to her friends (which are all quirky too!) We have visited the Dr so many times with aches, pains and fatigue, and they cannot find anything.
    It came to me yesterday - I wonder if she did have Aspergers after all.. and her symptoms, rather than looking like ME are in fact stress related??
    Should I have her assessed again?

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    1. I'm not in a position to advise you on what you should do. Your daughter's age is a tough one. They also say that the growth during puberty is so dramatic, kids need as much sleep as toddlers do! Your daughter might just really BE tired due to her age.

      The general advice I do give is to listen to your gut. A mother's instinct is oftentimes right.

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  68. who does one go to to get a child assessed for this? My son is way ahead at 3 and 1/2 in everything except for social skills. He is having trouble approaching other kids and initiating play. He has a great relationship with his sister and his cousins but he has trouble at pre-school and isn't interested in approaching strangers on the play ground at all. He does better with older kids because they are more likely to approach him and they have verbal skills that are closer to his level. I'm wondering about Aspergers. He only fits about a third of your list, if that though.

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    1. We took our daughter to a clinical psychologist who does the assessment. She also did IQ tests. It's possible your son has a high IQ (symptoms can resemble Asperger's) or is shy about making the first move. However, I always say if you have a feeling in your gut that something is off, it's a good idea to listen to it!

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  69. my 8 year old son is having his first assessment in a weeks time after visiting my gp who said my sons behaviour sounds like aspergers! i have been feeling really guilty and nervouse about the whole process but now feel much better after reading your symptoms list of which he ticks 10/12 and reading your blogs i feel more confident im doing the right thing by him! and its comforting to read about other people going through the same process! look forward 2 your next blog.

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    1. Best of luck to you. When my daughter was assessed, I initially felt great--I was able to put a name on her behaviors. But after that wore away, I became pretty depressed. After she started receiving help,however, I noticed huge improvements! Getting her diagnosed was by far the best thing I have ever done!

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  70. What a crock of sh#t! And what's worse is the legion of assheads that are on this site corroborating this nonsense. It's no wonder the American Psychiatric Association is demanding that Ass-burgers be removed from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV). You people should be ashamed of yourselves.

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    1. I doubt my blog has any impact on what the APA decides for the DSM V.

      What is your issue with the list specifically?

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  71. My son was diagnosed with Aspergers in December last year. He just turned three when he received his diagnosis, which is super young.

    I honestly had no idea he had it at first; I just thought he was quirky (which is something I see over and over when reading about this.) I knew he had some definite strengths; he knew all his letters, the alphabet forward and backwards, and could read and spell dozens of words by two and a half. By three, he was counting by 2s, then 3s, and 4s, and at three and a half currently, can count by numbers up to 17. When he gets very high, he'll ask me what's next (I have no clue; I'm terrible at math).

    Other stuff? At halloween, he didn't eat a bit of candy. But he organized his candy bowl over and over again... by color, by type, brand, etc.

    BUt honestly, none of those things even prompted me to call our doctor. His 'side-eyeing' did. He would walk along walls, the perimeter of the pool, etc, and look at it only out of the corner of his eye. And I thought, wow, THAT's odd. So I called his pediatrician who said that she'd see him, but that it's not normal and she'd rather just refer him for an eval. A million appointments, evals, and doctors later, and we had our diagnosis.

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  72. My son is 3 and lately I have been having problems with his behavior he will throw the worst temper tantrums for the smallest things and when his father and I try to talk to him he will cover his eyes and when we tell him to respond he doesnt its like he doesnt listen or ignores. He is a smart boy but when he gets nad he goes crazy. he has his good days or his bad days...on his good days he will talk to me and is very loving and just the sweetest boy ever but on his bad days he doesnt talk, listen often throws tantrums if you tell him the smallest thing he will put his hands in his mouth, bang his head on everything takes his clothes off, kicks his shoes off, and we will have to hold him sonetimes to get him to calm down...sometimes when i rock him it will put him to sleep but it doesnt always work...im scared to go to a doctor and they just say hes just like any other 3 year old. I have another son who is 6 with ADHD, anxiety, and a learning disability. Should I get a doctors opinion on my 3 year old??

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    1. I would get him assessed. I've been fighting his Dr.s on it but now I have 2 special ed teachers telling me he definitely is on the spectrum. I'm also trying to figure out if there is a Carers assessment I can print out. Good luck I hope you get answers quickly.

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  73. I'm 15 and I've had all these symptoms for as long as I can remember. Yet, no one has bothered to notice it yet.

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  74. Thanks for this list, and hi to anonymous just above - like her/him, my sons at aged 14 and 16 have many of these symptoms (except that like one other commenter they have excessive empathy, rather than not enough- the youngest one cries for his teacher when the other kids in class act up, which is kind of embarassing at 14). I suspect neither of them are fully 'Aspergers' but are generally 'a bit quirky' - I love your title! Through getting to know them well and tailoring our homelife to suit them, we have a great family life together. School is sometimes harder. And my biggest concern is that my dad, newly married-again, has decided that their oddities have got to stop and they will have to behave 'properly' when they come to visit him and his new wife. It's out of concern about this scenario that I'm researching their 'quirks' for the first time, to see if I can explain them to him.

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  75. I spoke to my doctor and they say my symptons are stress but when I check the symptons of aspergers I have most of them and doing the test I score 44 I'm not sure what I should do

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    1. Going through the diagnosis with my daughter, I realized that I probably have a bit of Asperger's as well. For me, learning this helped explain so much and actually put me more at ease with myself. I like to recommend my friend, Stimey's blog at http://www.stimeyland.com . She discovered pretty recently that she has Asperger's and blogs a bit about it. I'm not sure there really is anything you need to do! If you want more information or support, you can always seek at an Asperger's support group. Best of luck!

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  76. My teenage grandson has almost all the symptoms noted. I've mentioned this to my daughter-n-law for a year now, to no avail, and am now ready to talk with my son about the problem. This is what I notice in my grandson: he will argue about everything; he gets angry quickly; he is socially dysfunctional (likes and has friends, but doesn't know how to interact); has strange rituals (twirling hair, constantly drumming motions, sticks his finger into his mouth before eating food), will not swallow saliva, spits constantly, can't follow orders, terrible time in school with teachers, and in the last week has started washing his hands (without drying)several times a day, is rude and disrespectful. Positive side: Is very intelligent, loves animals (rescues constantly), seems to love his parents and me (is concerned when we are unhappy), tries to act better...back to negative, anything that he enjoys doing he seems to loose himself in it, would play games all day/night; hates to go to bed, takes showers but we have to make him use soap/shampoo, likes to keep his same clothes on and his wardrobe for school seems to be baggy jeans, shirt and hoodie (with hood pulled over his head until someone makes him take it off). Also came up with idea to wear handkerchief like a bandit would wear as a mask. I have had him almost every day of his life, he was a happy child, but something happened when he began to play sports (which he is not good at)and it has only gotten worse through the years. His parents alibi his behavior as just being a "spoiled brat". Please help me deal with his parents.

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  77. I am confused by what you commented on in #5. An interest in anything related to science doesn't seem to be that limited to me becuase science can cover many different ares of modern life. however I do have aspergers and an interest comparable to hers.

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  78. i realize that this post is older, but i would consider doing some more research on the empathizing.

    i have aspergers. ive often been considered "insensitive" - but ive always felt that was an inaccurate description of my feelings. i am not unable to be empathetic, but rather i feel someone else's pains so strongly sometimes, that if they would just do x, they might feel better (and i would too because the stress of their emotional tumult would be gone... supposedly). i realize that though my solutions may not be practical or work for everyone (im still growing but i dont give advice like that as much anymore LOL), but still, im far from empathetic. i feel someone else's pain as if it were my own, and its emotionally disturbing. im sure that kids also have the same tendencies, and less information to process why they feel that way.

    i distinctly remember feeling stressed out when the teachers were stressed out (in a small school we knew everything about everything, even when there were administration problems LOL).

    anyway. just a note i HAD to add.

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    1. You and everyone else! haha! I wrote this list when my own daughter was having problems with empathy. Since then, her empathy has blossomed beautifully, and I give my apologied for including that on the list. While I think it might be true for some people on the spectrum, it certainly isn't true for everyone--and probably not true for the majority of people on the spectrum.

      Thanks so much for sharing your insights. It's much appreciated!

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  79. What if what you read seems to be the exact opposite of what you read, like I make friends really easily, or I do seem to focus on one thing at a time, but if I decide to change what I'm focusing on I can do it at the drop of a hat. I do seem to have certain emotional issues, but I think that's because my mother died and it was up to me to try and save her. The reason why I ask is my family has asperger's syndrome within it, and my sisters keep saying it sounds like asperger's syndrome, so I read everything and see things differently. I mean even one of my sisters is noted at saying is there anyplace you don't have friends, in fact if anything I seem to have a way to get anyone to talk to me. I have gone through the symptoms several times and they just don't seem to match me, can anyone tell me what they might be seeing in me that keeps making them see asperger's syndrome?

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    1. I can't tell anyone that they have Asperger's. I'm so NOT qualified to do that. The fact that you can make friends easily might be a good indicator that you don't--or if you do, it's probably not much of a concern since you're doing great socially!

      Have you ever had your IQ tested? There is quite a bit of overlap in symtpoms with people that have Asperger's and those that have high IQs, so that's something to consider as well.

      I consider myself to be pretty outgoing. Yet after my daughter's diagnosis, I realized I'm ever so slightly on the spectrum myself, although not enough to ever be diagnosed.

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